Words of the Buddha

TV Buddha - Closed circuit TV installation with bronze statue, by Nam June Paik (1974)

TV Buddha – Closed circuit TV installation with bronze statue, by Nam June Paik (1974)

www.pariyatti.org


Victor’s talking tea says “by honoring your words you are honored”


Exalted in mind & heedful,
the sage trained in sagacity’s ways:
One has no sorrows, one who is Such,
calmed & ever mindful.


Rouse yourself! Sit up!
Resolutely train yourself to attain peace.
Do not let the king of death, seeing you are careless, lead you astray and dominate you.


The entire world is in flames,
the entire world is going up in smoke;
the entire world is burning,
the entire world is vibrating.
But that which does not vibrate or burn, which is experienced by the noble ones, where death has no entry– in that my mind delights.


One truly is the protector of oneself;
who else could the protector be?
With oneself fully controlled,
one gains a mastery that is hard to gain.


Those who mistake the unessential to be essential
and the essential to be unessential,
dwelling in wrong thoughts,
never arrive at the essential.


May all creatures, all living things, all beings one and all, experience good fortune only.
May they not fall into harm.


Ever grows the glory of one
who is energetic, mindful and pure in conduct, discerning and self-controlled, righteous and heedful.


Solitude is happiness for one who is content, who has heard the Dhamma and clearly sees.
Non-affliction is happiness in the world — harmlessness towards all living beings.


Whatever an enemy might do to an enemy,
or a foe to a foe,
the ill-directed mind
can do to you even worse.


Winning gives birth to hostility.
Losing, one lies down in pain.
The calmed lie down with ease, having set winning and losing aside.


Things that are empty make a noise,
the full is always quiet.
The fool is like a half-filled pot,
the wise one is like a deep still pool.


They do not lament over the past,
they yearn not for what is to come,
they maintain themselves in the present, thus their complexion is serene.


One should give up anger, renounce pride, and overcome all fetters.
Suffering never befalls one who clings not to mind and body and is detached.


When a bhikkhu has good friends, and is reverential and respectful; Doing what one’s friends advise, clearly comprehending and mindful; One may progressively attain the destruction of all fetters.


Impermanent truly are compound things,
by nature arising and passing away.
If they arise and are extinguished,
their eradication brings happiness.


Those who mistake the unessential to be essential and the essential to be unessential, dwelling in wrong thoughts, never arrive at the essential.


There is no more worldly existence for the wise one who, like the earth, resents nothing, who is firm as a high pillar and as pure as a deep pool free from mud.


Ever grows the glory of one who is energetic, mindful and pure in conduct, discerning and self-controlled, righteous and heedful.


Let one guard oneself against irritability in speech; let one be controlled in speech.
Abandoning verbal misconduct,
let one practice good conduct in speech.


One should do what one teaches others to do; if one would train others, one should be well controlled oneself.
Difficult, indeed, is self-control.


Above, across or back again, wherever one goes in the world
let one carefully scrutinize the rise and fall of compounded things.


Think not lightly of good, saying, “It will not come to me.”
Drop by drop is the water pot filled.
Likewise, the wise one, gathering it little by little, fills oneself with good.


Whose mind is like rock, steady, unmoved,
dispassionate for things that spark passion,
unangered by things that spark anger:
When one’s mind is developed like this,
from where can there come suffering & stress?


Were there a mountain all made of gold,
doubled that would not be enough to satisfy a single man:
know this and live accordingly.


Even when obstacles crowd in, the path to Nibbana can be won
by those who establish mindfulness and bring to perfection equipoise.


If by renouncing a lesser happiness
one may realize a greater happiness,
let the wise one renounce the lesser,
having regard for the greater.


When faced with the vicissitudes of life, one’s mind remains unshaken, sorrowless, stainless, secure; this is the greatest welfare.


Look not to the faults of others,
nor to their omissions and commissions.
But rather look to your own acts,
to what you have done and left undone.


Mind precedes all things;
mind is their chief, mind is their maker.
If one speaks or does a deed
with a mind that is pure within,
happiness then follows along
like a never departing shadow.


The fool thinks one has won a battle
when one bullies with harsh speech,
but knowing how to be forbearing
alone makes one victorious.


Difficult to detect and very subtle,
the mind seizes whatever it wants;
so let a wise one guard one’s mind,
for a guarded mind brings happiness.


Just as a tree, though cut down,
sprouts up again if its roots remain uncut and firm, even so, until the craving that lies dormant is rooted out, suffering springs up again and again.


Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.


Exalted in mind & heedful,
the sage trained in sagacity’s ways:
One has no sorrows, one who is Such,
calmed & ever mindful.


Just as a mountain of rock,
is unwavering, well-settled,
so the monk whose delusion is ended,
like a mountain, is undisturbed.


One who is virtuous and wise shines forth like a blazing fire;
like a bee collecting nectar, one acquires wealth by harming none.


Impermanent are all compounded things.
When one perceives this with true insight, then one becomes detached from suffering; this is the path of purification.


Better it is to live one day virtuous and meditative
than to live a hundred years immoral and uncontrolled.


Few among people are those who cross to the farther shore.
The rest, the bulk of people, only run up and down the hither bank.
But those who act according to the perfectly taught Dhamma will cross the realm of Death, so difficult to cross.


Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, hearing which one attains peace.


Mind precedes all phenomena,
mind matters most, everything is mind-made.
If with an impure mind
one performs any action of speech or body, then suffering will follow that person as the cartwheel follows the foot of the draught animal.


One should do what one teaches others to do; if one would train others, one should be well controlled oneself.
Difficult, indeed, is self-control.


They do not lament over the past,
they yearn not for what is to come,
they maintain themselves in the present, thus their complexion is serene.


Heedfulness is the path to the Deathless.
Heedlessness is the path to death.
The heedful die not.
The heedless are as if dead already.


Solitude is happiness for one who is content, who has heard the Dhamma and clearly sees.
Non-affliction is happiness in the world — harmlessness towards all living beings.


Calm is one’s thought, calm one’s speech, and calm one’s deed, who, truly knowing, is wholly freed, perfectly tranquil and wise.


Let one guard oneself against irritability in thought; let one be controlled in mind.
Abandoning mental misconduct, let one practice good conduct in thought.


Through countless births in the cycle of existence I have run, not finding although seeking the builder of this house; and again and again I faced the suffering of new birth.
Oh housebuilder! Now you are seen.

You shall not build a house again for me.
All your beams are broken,
the ridgepole is shattered.
The mind has become freed from conditioning:
the end of craving has been reached.


Arise! Do not be heedless!
Lead a righteous life.
The righteous live happily
both in this world and the next.


The fool thinks one has won a battle when one bullies with harsh speech,
but knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.


Think not lightly of good, saying, “It will not come to me.”
Drop by drop is the water pot filled.
Likewise, the wise one, gathering it little by little, fills oneself with good.


With good will for the entire cosmos,
cultivate a limitless heart:
Above, below, & all around,
unobstructed, without hostility or hate.


‘Be Content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you.’ ~Lao Tzu


Should a seeker not find a companion who is better or equal,
let one resolutely pursue a solitary course; there is no fellowship with the fool.


Wonderful it is to train the mind,
so swiftly moving, seizing whatever it wants.
Good is it to have a well-trained mind,
for a well-trained mind brings happiness.


Silent in body, silent in speech,
silent in mind, without defilement,
blessed with silence is the sage.
One is truly washed of evil.


“As I am, so are others;
as others are, so am I.”
Having thus identified self and others,
harm no one nor have them harmed.


Silent in body, silent in speech,
silent in mind, without defilement,
blessed with silence is the sage.
One is truly washed of evil.


Things that are empty make a noise,
the full is always quiet.
The fool is like a half-filled pot,
the wise one is like a deep still pool.


Whatever an enemy might do to an enemy,
or a foe to a foe,
the ill-directed mind
can do to you even worse.


Let one guard oneself against irritability in bodily action; let one be controlled in deed.
Abandoning bodily misconduct, let one practice good conduct in deed.


One who is virtuous and wise shines forth like a blazing fire;
like a bee collecting nectar one acquires wealth by harming none.


In every virtue all-accomplished, with wisdom full and mind composed,
looking within and ever mindful-thus one crosses the raging flood.


One who does not strike nor makes others strike, who robs not nor makes others rob, sharing love with all that live, finds enmity with none.


Wonderful it is to train the mind, so swiftly moving, seizing whatever it wants.
Good is it to have a well-trained mind, for a well-trained mind brings happiness.


Some recluses and brahmins, so called, Are deeply attached to their own views;
People who only see one side of things
Engage in quarrels and disputes.


Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the hostile.
Amidst hostile people we dwell free from hatred.


Those to whom the Dhamma is clear are not led into other doctrines;
perfectly enlightened with perfect knowledge, they walk evenly over the uneven.


Just as rust arising from iron
eats away the base from which it arises, even so, their own deeds lead transgressors to states of woe.


Little though one recites the sacred texts, but puts the Teaching into practice, forsaking lust, hatred, and delusion, with true wisdom and emancipated mind, clinging to nothing of this or any other world — one indeed partakes of the blessings of a holy life.


If you fear pain, if you dislike pain, don’t do an evil deed in open or secret.
If you’re doing or will do an evil deed, you won’t escape pain: it will catch you even as you run away.


Rouse yourself! Sit up!
Resolutely train yourself to attain peace.
Do not let the king of death, seeing you are careless, lead you astray and dominate you.


Speak not harshly to anyone, for those thus spoken to might retort.
Indeed, angry speech hurts, and retaliation may overtake you.


Let go of the past, let go of the future, let go of the present, and cross over to the farther shore of existence.
With mind wholly liberated,
you shall come no more to birth and death.


Though all one’s life a fool associates with a wise person, one no more comprehends the Truth than a spoon tastes the flavor of the soup.


If by renouncing a lesser happiness one may realize a greater happiness,
let the wise one renounce the lesser, having regard for the greater.


One is not wise because one speaks much.
One who is peaceable, friendly and fearless is called “wise”.


One by one, little by little, moment by moment, a wise one should remove one’s own impurities, as a smith removes dross from silver.


Let one guard oneself against irritability in bodily action; let one be controlled in deed.
Abandoning bodily misconduct, let one practice good conduct in deed.


There is nothing more dreadful than the habit of doubt. Doubt separates people. It is a poison that disintegrates friendships and breaks up pleasant relations. It is a thorn that irritates and hurts; it is a sword that kills.


Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.


Silent in body, silent in speech, silent in mind, without defilement, blessed with silence is the sage.
One is truly washed of evil.


In this world, good it is to serve one’s mother, good it is to serve one’s father, good it is to serve the monks, and good it is to serve the holy ones.


Any sensual bliss in the world, any heavenly bliss, isn’t worth one sixteenth-sixteenth of the bliss of the ending of craving.


By effort and heedfulness, discipline and self-mastery, let the wise one make for oneself an island which no flood can overwhelm.


Well done is that action of doing which one repents not later, and the fruit of which, one reaps with delight and happiness.


Impermanent truly are compound things, by nature arising and passing away. If they arise and are extinguished, their eradication brings happiness.


One has broken the cycle, attained freedom from desire. The dried-up stream no longer flows. The cycle, broken, no longer turns. This, just this, is the end of misery.


There are those who do not realize that one day we all must die.
But those who do realize this settle their quarrels.


This is to be done by one skilled in aims who wants to break through to the state of peace:


Be capable, upright, & straightforward, easy to instruct, gentle, & not conceited, content & easy to support, with few duties, living lightly, with peaceful faculties, masterful, modest, & no greed for supporters.


Do not do the slightest thing that the wise would later censure.


One who has crossed over the mire, crushed the thorn of sensuality, reached the ending of delusion, is a monk undisturbed by bliss & pain.


Solitude is happiness for one who is content, who has heard the Dhamma and clearly sees.
Non-affliction is happiness in the world – harmlessness towards all living beings.


Let one guard oneself against irritability in speech; let one be controlled in speech.
Abandoning verbal misconduct, let one practice good conduct in speech.


If you fear pain, if you dislike pain, don’t do an evil deed in open or secret.
If you’re doing or will do an evil deed, you won’t escape pain: it will catch you even as you run away.


Whose mind is like rock, steady, unmoved, dispassionate for things that spark passion, unangered by things that spark anger: When one’s mind is developed like this, from where can there come suffering & stress?


Few among people are those who cross to the farther shore.
The rest, the bulk of people, only run up and down the hither bank.
But those who act according to the perfectly taught Dhamma will cross the realm of Death, so difficult to cross.


One is one’s own protector, one is one’s own refuge.
Therefore, one should control oneself, even as a trader controls a noble steed.


As a mother would risk her life to protect her child, her only child,
even so should one cultivate a limitless heart with regard to all beings.


The entire world is in flames,
the entire world is going up in smoke;
the entire world is burning,
the entire world is vibrating.
But that which does not vibrate or burn, which is experienced by the noble ones, where death has no entry– in that my mind delights.


One should do what one teaches others to do;
if one would train others,
one should be well controlled oneself.
Difficult, indeed, is self-control.


One should give up anger, renounce pride,
and overcome all fetters.
Suffering never befalls one
who clings not to mind and body and is detached.


Who is energetic and not indolent,
In misfortune unshaken,
Flawless in manner and intelligent,
Such a one to honor may attain.


One should first establish oneself
in what is proper and only then
try to instruct others. Doing this,
the wise one will not be criticized.